Nuclear Energy for Australia? 2-day conference!

The Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE), an independent body of professional engineers and technologists, believes the hesitant debate on nuclear energy in Australia needs to be responsibly refocused and reliably and factually informed.

I am delighted to announce that the Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE) will be hosting a two-day conference in Sydney this year with one theme and one theme only: Nuclear Energy for Australia? I have read the draft program, and it is an incredible line-up of speakers covering a huge range of nuclear issues. A veritable who’s-who of scientists, academics, economists and business people will be leaving few stones unturned. I am honoured to be counted among the speakers on the program.

If you are getting the distinct feeling that the quality of discussion about nuclear power and decarbonisation energy supplies in Australia is set to step up in 2013, you are not alone. We now have the AETA report and subsequent CSIRO efutures modelling tool giving very clear indications of the positive role nuclear energy could play. The Zero Carbon Options report is continuing to build momentum and I expect this to continue through next year. Pandora’s Promise will be hitting festival screens from January and bringing the pro-nuclear environmentalist perspective to the mainstream. Now a two-day conference from this independent and highly respected Australian group of engineers and technologists.

Had I foreseen all this in late 2010 when I finally changed my mind on nuclear energy and decided to begin working for change, I would have been very, very encouraged.

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ATSE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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5 thoughts on “Nuclear Energy for Australia? 2-day conference!

  1. John Newlands

    Some deep impressions could sink into the public’s mind by the middle of next year. One is that Japan has managed to combine a flat economy with increasing emissions. Germany also appears flat economically but they use the trick of comparing emissions to the 1990s to give themselves a large buffer.

    If the Australian national election is to be held by November there will be a lot of blather about carbon tax and emissions. Frankly c.t. hasn’t achieved enough and flattening of electricity demand can be attributed to other factors. We have basically the same emissions as 20 years ago. Politicians will be looking for something big to announce before the election. This conference is well timed.

    Reply
  2. Albert Rogers

    The coral reefs, worldwide. are in desperate danger both from CO2 acidification and from plain old warming. Is the Great Barrier Reef of Australia one of the biggest such biomes?
    Isn’t it downwind of Australia’s coal burning? It’s time to replace those things with LFTR or IFR nukes.

    Reply
      1. Mark Bolton

        This is a great piece of news to usher in the 2013 ! Debate and information is what we need to see to get the community focused on this issue. Ignorance and silence only favours reactionary elements. I was delighted to see Monboit “turned” over Fukushima ! I belive it was because of the hysterical FUD from Caldicot, Gunderson, Kaku and the rest he took a second look at the issue. It certainly woke me up. Kaku was particularly loathesome. If that is the doomsday senario – the worst it gets and noone got hurt well “bring on the nukes” I say.

        Reply

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